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  • Rock Rousseau

Creamy Spicy Guacamole

Updated: Jan 19, 2020


This spicy guacamole features avocado, sour cream, and tomatoes. Use as a dip, spread, or add to a salad.

  • 3 large ripe avocados, peeled and pitted

  • 1 small tomato, seeded and chopped

  • 1 TBSN lime juice

  • 1/2 cup fresh cilantro, finely chopped

  • 1/4 cup sour cream

  • 1 teaspoon white vinegar

  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper

  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin

  • 1/2 cup yellow onion, finely chopped

  • 2 TBSN garlic, minced

  • 2 serrano chili peppers, seeded and finely chopped

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt


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medium bowl, cooking spoon, fork or potato masher, sharp knife, measuring cup.

Prep: 15 min Ready: 2 hr. Serves: 3 cups

1. Use a fork or potato masher to mash avocados with lime juice in a medium bowl.

2. Add cilantro, onion, garlic, serrano chili peppers, sour cream, cumin, cayenne pepper and salt. Continue to mash as chunky or as smooth as you wish. Stir to thoroughly combine.


3. Fold in tomatoes and stir to combine.


4. Refrigerate for at least two hours.



1 serving: Calories: 90 Total Fat: 7.9g Saturated Fat: 1.0g Cholesterol: < 1mg Sodium: 11mg Potassium: 293mg Total Carbohydrates: 5.4g Dietary Fiber: 3.8g Protein: 1.2g Sugars: 1g

Guacamole serves as a source of several essential nutrients that benefit your health. However, it also packs a hefty caloric punch -- a cup of guacamole can contain almost 400 calories. Eat the food in moderation as part of a balanced diet. Guacamole provides a healthy dose of unsaturated fat, the type of fat beneficial to your health. Unsaturated fat lowers harmful blood cholesterol, and a diet rich in monounsaturated fat -- the kind found in avocados -- also lowers blood pressure, according to the Harvard School of Public Health. Making your guacamole with one avocado provides you with 19.7 grams of healthy monounsaturated fat. Eating guacamole also boosts your intake of vitamin C, as avocado, tomato and lime juice all provide the vitamin. Guacamole made with one avocado, one small tomato and the juice from one lime contains 45.8 milligrams of vitamin C -- around half the recommended daily intake for men or slightly less than two-thirds of the daily recommended intake for women, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. Getting enough vitamin C keeps your skin healthy, and strengthens your blood vessels, tendons, ligaments and other connective tissues.

Zesty whites, such as New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc. The mouth-watering acidity in the wine cuts through the sweetness and fattiness of the fruit. That's why a non-vintage sparking wine or Pinot Grigio also works.




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