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HOW TO use the WORLD’s BEST SUPER FOOD Ingredients


Super Foods are linked to nurturing a sharper mind, producing clearer skin, sustaining a healthier immune system, and improving your overall well-being. Our bodies require specific vitamins and nutrients. Unfortunately, Many of today's modern diets ignore many of these nutrients. Because of this deficiency, it is important to take your own personal diet into consideration. While many dietitians have questioned the validity of "Super Foods", there is no arguing that many fruits, vegetables, and proteins offer huge health benefits

Our list contains over 50 types of the most nutritional food ingredients to include in you regular diet. Consider stocking up on the best Super Foods for your body. Whether it's brain-boosting blueberries or cancer-fighting broccoli sprouts, these options aren't just great for your health — they're also delicious; especially when combined with each other.


Check out our Super Food recipes where we combine several Super Food ingredients for a delicious, power-packed meal.


Though many foods could be described as "Super," no single food holds the key to good health or disease prevention. These are the food ingredients that contain the most health benefits as recommended by several sources including:

  • Medical News Today

  • Healthline

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Harvard School of Public Health

  • Mayo Clinic

  • Washington State Department of Health

 

ACAI

Acai (ah-sigh-EE) berries have benefits ranging from improved skin appearance to weight loss. A serving or two of this anthocyanin-rich berry can dramatically boost the amount of antioxidants in your blood. High in fiber, acai berries are naturally sweet, and their rich colors mean they are high in antioxidants and disease-fighting nutrients. When acai berries are not in season, it is just as healthy to buy them frozen. Add them to yogurt, oatmeal, smoothies, or eat for a snack.

 

ALMONDS

Almonds are a good source of protein. They also contain monounsaturated fats, which may be a factor in reducing the risk of heart disease. Add a handful to your trail mix, oatmeal, yogurt, or have as a snack. Almonds are also a great accompaniment to cooked veggies or salads. They are a well rounded food that can be used as quick supplement, or a complete meal replacement. Almonds are rich in fiber, protein and heart-healthy fats. They also pack various plant compounds with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, which can protect against oxidative stress. Eating almonds can have a protective effect against heart disease and significantly reduce total cholesterol levels. They are high in calories, so limit to a small handful per serving.

 

APPLES

Apples are nutritional powerhouses because of their impressive nutritional profile. They contain about 14% of our daily needs of Vitamin C. Apples contain powerful natural antioxidants like quercetin, B-complex vitamins, minerals such as calcium and potassium, and dietary fiber. They also contain phytonutrients which help protect the body from the detrimental effects of free radicals, which cause undesirable changes in the body and may contribute to chronic conditions, as well as the aging process. The powerful antioxidants in apples might extend a person’s life span, reduce the risk of chronic disease, help prevent dementia, reduce your risk of lung cancer, and reduce the risk of stroke and diabetes.

 

ASPARAGUS

Asparagus is rich in dietary fiber and contains high levels of vitamin A, vitamin C, and calcium, as well as several phytochemicals: the chemicals made by plants that have a positive effect on your health, including, vitamin B6, calcium, zinc, and magnesium. A half-cup of asparagus supplies 50% of your daily bone-building vitamin K and a third of your day's folate. They are an excellent source of iron, vitamin A, and lutein for eye health. Asparagus is also a natural diuretic, which can help with bloating, maintaining fluid balance in the body, and influence blood pressure and edema.


The potential health benefits of asparagus include reducing the risk of diabetes, preventing kidney stones, and lowering the risk of neural tube defects in babies. Throw them into salads or sauté them in a little olive oil. You can also add them to soups and stews.

 

AVOCADOS

Avocado is a highly nutritious fruit, though it’s often treated more like a vegetable in culinary applications. Similar to olive oil, avocado is high in monounsaturated fats (MUFAs) which are the best kind of fat and ideal fuel source for the human body. Consuming avocados increases levels of high-density lipoprotein, or “good,” cholesterol and also helps your body block the absorption of bad cholesterol, removing more harmful fat from the bloodstream. Oleic acid is the most predominant MUFA in avocado, which is linked to reduced inflammation in the body. This healthy fat in avocado keeps you satisfied and helps you absorb other nutrients. They’re high in lutein, which aids eyesight, and in potassium and folate, which may reduce the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease. They also have tons of vitamins and nutrients such as B vitamins, vitamin K, vitamin E, and more potassium than bananas. Avocados might also have anticancer properties. Avocados may also have associations with improved nutrient absorption, better overall diet, and fewer metabolic risk factors. Eating avocados may reduce your risk of heart disease, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.

 

BANANAS

Bananas are naturally free of fat, cholesterol, and sodium, and very rich in potassium. Because the fruit's sugar content is balanced with fiber, it helps maintain a healthy blood glucose level. Even people with diabetes can enjoy a banana, according to the American Diabetes Association. Because they're loaded with several nutrients, bananas may help you flight cancer, risk of developing childhood leukemia, asthma, high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease.

 

BEETS

Beetroot, also known simply as the beet, can improve athletic performance, lower blood pressure and increase blood flow. This is partly due to its high content of nitrates, which increase nitric oxide in the body and play a substantial role in heart and vascular health. The pigment betacyanin, which gives beets their rich red color, is just one of several disease-fighting phytonutrients found in this vegetable.


Beets are a rich source of folate and manganese, and also contains thiamine, riboflavin, vitamin B-6, pantothenic acid, choline, betaine, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper, and selenium. Beets are high in fiber and beta-carotene, and folate, which guards against birth defects, colon cancer, and osteoporosis. Slice some up and toss in a salad or smoothie.

 

BISON (BUFFALO)

Bison meat packs a bunch of essential nutrients, including protein, iron, zinc, selenium, and B vitamins. Providing around 17 grams of protein per raw 4-ounce (113-gram) serving, bison is considered an excellent source of protein to help with tissue rebuilding, hormone production, and nutrient transport.

When compared with many other meats, bison is very low in fat and overall calories, with a raw 4-ounce (113-gram) serving providing 6 grams of fat and 124 calories. By swapping out fattier cuts of meat for bison, you may be able to get the same amount of beneficial nutrients with fewer grams of fat and calories, which is helpful for those looking to lose weight. They are high in B vitamins which regulate many cellular processes throughout your body, including energy and neurochemical production, as well as red blood cell formation. In addition to its relatively high vitamin B content, bison is an excellent source of selenium and zinc, with one raw 4-ounce (113-gram) serving providing 13%, 31%, and 35% of the DV for each mineral. Selenium serves as an antioxidant that fights oxidative stress, which fights off free radicals and antioxidants that can lead to tissue dysfunction and disease. Meanwhile, zinc supports your body’s immune system and helps fight various illnesses. More specifically, it promotes cell division and growth, as well as wound healing. Proper zinc intake can help ensure optimal immune function.


Bison is also an excellent source of iron, which plays an important role in building red blood cells, which are the main transporters of oxygen in your blood and necessary for all oxygen-requiring processes.

 

BLACK BEANS

Black beans are loaded with nutrients and play a role in preventing and managing various diseases. They are a rich source of B vitamins, various minerals, protein, fiber, and flavonoids — antioxidants that help your arteries stay relaxed and pliable.


Black beans offer many health benefits including improved type 2 diabetes management, as well as reduced blood pressure, reduce the risk of heart disease, and cholesterol. They are an excellent source of fiber, folate, and plant-based protein. Eating black beans regularly may also promote healthy weight maintenance, due to their ability to improve feelings of feeling full. Add to salads, soups, and casseroles. Add them to your chili, salads, or make bean-based spread such as hummus.

 

BLACKBERRIES

Blackberries are a nutritional powerhouse of vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants which may prevent certain diseases and improve digestion.

The strong antioxidant capacity of berries is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease, cancer and other inflammatory conditions. They may also be effective in treating various digestive and immune-related disorders when used alongside traditional medical therapies. High in fiber, berries are naturally sweet, and their rich colors mean they are high in antioxidants and disease-fighting nutrients.


Blackberries boast more antioxidants than strawberries, cranberries, or blueberries. When berries are not in season, it is just as healthy to buy them frozen. Add to yogurt, cereals, and smoothies, or eat for a snack.

 

BLUEBERRIES

Fresh or frozen, blueberries have sky-high levels of antioxidants, which combat damage done by inflammation. They aid in improving memory by protecting the brain from inflammation and boosting communication between brain cells. Blueberries provide substantial amounts of fiber, antioxidants, and phytonutrients which may help prevent disease and maintain vital bodily functions.


Consuming blueberries may help protect against cognitive decline, which may help reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease and prevent cardiovascular disease. Blueberry polyphenols reduced obesity and certain metabolic risk factors and also improved the composition of gut bacteria. Studies have also shown that eating blueberries helped decrease blood pressure among adults with stage 1 hypertension.


Anthocyanins, the natural plant compounds that give blueberries their deep color, may have antidiabetic effects as well. Fresh or frozen, blueberries are high in fiber, and have even more antioxidants than cranberries, raspberries, strawberries. When blueberries are not in season, it is just as healthy to buy them frozen. Add to yogurt, cereals, and smoothies, or eat for a snack.

 

BRAZIL NUTS

Brazil nuts are high in selenium. In fact, one nut delivers more than an entire day's recommended value. Selenium is a vital mineral for maintaining thyroid function, and it is a great antioxidant for the human body. Brazil nuts are rich in fiber, plant protein and heart-healthy fats. They also pack various plant compounds with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, which can protect against oxidative stress. They also contain monounsaturated fats, which may be a factor in reducing the risk of heart disease. They are an excellent source of both protein and carbohydrates, and they also provide good amounts of vitamin B-1, vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc.


These nuts come in a hard shell and are usually available ready to eat, making them a quick, nutritious snack. Add a handful to oatmeal or yogurt or have as a snack. But remember they are high in calories, so limit to a small handful. Brazil nuts are also a great accompaniment to cooked veggies or salads.

 

BROCCOLI

Broccoli provides good amounts of fiber, calcium, potassium, folate, and phytonutrients. Phytonutrients are compounds that reduce the risk of developing heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers. Broccoli contains high levels of fiber (both soluble and insoluble) and is a rich source of vitamin C. In addition, broccoli is rich in vitamin A, iron, vitamin K, B-complex vitamins, zinc, phosphorus, and phytonutrients.


Studies have found that broccoli can potentially help prevent osteoarthritis, protect skin against the effects of UV light, reverse diabetes heart damage, and reduce bladder cancer risk. They are an excellent source of iron, vitamin A, and lutein for eye health. They also add fiber into the diet.


Broccoli contains a powerful range of disease fighters. Sulforaphane may increase enzymes that lower the incidence of colon and lung cancers. They are an excellent source of fiber, vitamins, and phytochemicals including indoles, thiocyanates, and nitriles, which may prevent against some types of cancer.


Steam or stir-fry, adding healthy oils and herbs and seasonings for flavor. However, overcooking broccoli can destroy many of its key nutrients. For this reason, it is best to eat it raw or lightly steamed. Try adding some florettes to soups, casseroles, and pasta dishes.Throw them into salads or sauté them in a little olive oil.

 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

Brussels sprouts are rich in glucosinolates, compounds that combat cancer and detoxify our bodies. They are an excellent source of iron, vitamin A, and lutein for eye health. They are an excellent source of fiber, vitamins, and phytochemicals including indoles, thiocyanates, and nitriles, which may prevent against some types of cancer.


Add them to salads or pair them with a main like chicken or steak. Steam or stir-fry, adding healthy oils and herbs and seasonings for flavor. Try adding them to soups, casseroles, and pasta dishes. Sauté them in a little Olive Oil.

 

CANNELLINI BEANS

Cannellini beans are fat-free and an excellent source of iron, folate and magnesium. Cannellini beans also support healthy cholesterol levels, thereby diminishing a heart attack risk. They are an excellent source of fiber, folate, and plant-based protein. Studies show they can help reduce the risk of heart disease. One quarter-cup serving contains 11 grams of protein. They’re a rich source of B vitamins, various minerals, protein and fiber.


Research indicates that they offer many health benefits including improved type 2 diabetes management, as well as reduced blood pressure and cholesterol.

Eating beans regularly may also promote healthy weight maintenance, due to their ability to improve feelings of feeling full, Low in calories, they have anti-inflammatory properties that help with diabetes and arthritis.


Add to salads, soups, and casseroles. Make a chili or a bean-based spread such as hummus.

 

CARROTS

Carrots are a particularly good source of beta carotene, fiber, vitamin K1, potassium, vitamin A, and antioxidants. They're a weight-loss-friendly food and have been linked to lower cholesterol levels and improved eye health


The potential health benefits of carrots include preventing lung cancer, destroying leukemia cells and inhibiting their progression, and helping to restore vision.

 

CAULIFLOWER

Cauliflower contains a powerful range of disease fighters. Sulforaphane, may increase enzymes that lower the incidence of colon and lung cancers. They are an excellent source of fiber, vitamins, and phytochemicals including indoles, thiocyanates, and nitriles, which may prevent against some types of cancer.


The potential health benefits of cauliflower include preventing mutations and reducing stress from free radicals, preventing constipation, and helping memory. They are an excellent source of iron, vitamin A, and lutein for eye health. They contain antioxidants and phytonutrients that can protect against cancer.

They also contain fiber that helps with satiety, weight loss, and a healthy digestive tract, choline that is essential for learning and memory, as well as many other important nutrients.


Steam or stir-fry, adding healthy oils and herbs and seasonings for flavor. Try adding cauliflower to soups, casseroles, and pasta dishes. You can also grate and boil them to make a low-carb cauliflower rice. Throw them into salads or sauté them in a little olive oil. You can also add them to soups and stews.

 

CINNAMON

Cinnamon is the gold medalist of the spice rack, with one of the highest antioxidant levels of all herbs and spices. It also has a positive effect on blood glucose levels, so adding it to meals can keep you feeling steady and satiated. Studies have found that cinnamon can potentially be effective against HIV, improve glucose and lipid levels in patients with type 2 diabetes, help prevent Alzheimer’s disease, and stop the destructive process of multiple sclerosis.

In addition, researchers at Penn State found that consuming cinnamon can help reduce the body’s negative responses to eating high-fat meals. Sprinkle some on your oatmeal, in your coffee, yogurt, or in your smoothies.

 

DARK CHOCOLATE

Dark chocolate is a delicious treat that's full of antioxidants, flavanols, vitamins, and nutrients. Studies have found that dark chocolate may improve eye health and cognitive abilities. The high antioxidant levels in dark chocolate make it a perfect indulgence. Chocolate is high in flavonoids, substances that have been shown to improve blood flow, suppress coughs, improve memory, and give you hydrated, smooth skin. Other potential benefits of eating dark chocolate include lowering cholesterol levels, preventing cognitive decline, and reducing the risk of cardiovascular problems.

 

EDAMAME

One cup of edamame has a whopping 18 grams of plant protein, as well as lots of fiber, folate, and cholesterol-lowering phytosterols. They’re loaded with nutrients and play a role in preventing and managing various diseases. They are a rich source of B vitamins, various minerals, protein and fiber. Research indicates that they offer many health benefits including improved type 2 diabetes management, as well as reduced blood pressure and cholesterol. Eating edamame regularly may also promote healthy weight maintenance, due to their ability to improve feelings of feeling full.

 

EGGS

The chicken egg has been a part of our diet since the dawn of civilization, and there is a fantastic reason for it. They contain a diverse range of vitamins and nutrients. They’re one of the best possible sources of low calorie, high quality proteins available. Eggs raise our body's good cholesterol levels, and contain important rare micronutrients like choline. According to the USDA, every egg has 6 grams of protein but just 72 calories. Eggs also have all nine essential amino acids and are rich in vitamins A, B12, B2 and B5, making them one of the most nutritious super foods on the planet.


Whole eggs are rich in many nutrients including B vitamins, choline, selenium, vitamin A, iron and phosphorus. Eggs contain two potent antioxidants, zeaxanthin and lutein, which are known to protect vision and eye health.

Despite fears surrounding egg consumption and high cholesterol, research indicates no measurable increase in heart disease or diabetes risk from eating up to 6–12 eggs per week. In fact, eating eggs could increase “good” HDL cholesterol in some people, which may lead to a favorable reduction in heart disease risk.

 

FLAXSEED

Flaxseed is an excellent source of two fatty acids that are essential for human health – linoleic acid and alpha-linolenic acid. They are also an excellent source of fiber and a good source of minerals and vitamins according to the American Nutrition Association. The potential health benefits associated with flaxseed include lowering cholesterol, protecting against cancer, preventing hot flashes, and improving blood sugar levels.Omega-3 fatty acids speed up cell metabolism and reduce inflammation in the body, reducing triglyceride levels and lowering blood pressure. They also pack various anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, which can protect against oxidative stress. Flaxseed is a good source of plant protein, fiber, and heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, which may be a factor in reducing the risk of heart disease. For a fast hit, sprinkle some on oatmeal, yogurt, or salads.

 

GARLIC

Garlic is a popular culinary ingredient due to its distinct flavor, but it has also been used for its medicinal benefits for centuries. It is widely used for several conditions linked to the blood system and the heart. Studies have found that garlic can potentially be a very powerful antibiotic, help protect the heart during cardiac surgery and after a heart attack, lower the risk of developing lung cancer, and reduce high cholesterol and blood pressure levels. Garlic is a good source of manganese, vitamin C, vitamin B6, selenium and fiber. They can help lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Research suggests they inhibit the growth of prostate, stomach, and colon cancer cells. They also have antibiotic properties as well as supporting immune function. What’s more, sulfur-containing compounds in garlic may even play a role in preventing certain types of cancer. Add some to your soups, salads, and pasta.

 

GINGER

Ginger comes from the root of a flowering plant from China. It’s used as both a culinary flavor enhancer and for its multiple medicinal effects. Ginger contains a chemical that is used as an ingredient in antacid, laxative, and anti-gas medications. Studies have found that ginger can potentially prevent inflammation of the colon, reduce exercise-induced muscle pain, help alleviate nausea caused by chemotherapy, and reduce the severity of period pains.


Ginger contains antioxidants, such as gingerol, that may be responsible for many of the reported health benefits associated with this root. Ginger may be effective for managing nausea and reducing pain from acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. It may also reduce your risk of chronic illnesses such as heart disease, dementia and certain cancers. Ginger is available fresh, as an oil or juice and in dried/powdered forms. It’s easy to incorporate into soups, stir-fries, sauces and teas. Ginger is also great with sushi.

 

GREEN PEAS

Peas are a good source of vitamins C and E, zinc, Omega-3 and antioxidants that strengthen your immune system. Other nutrients, such as vitamins A and B and coumestrol, help reduce inflammation and lower your risk of chronic conditions, including diabetes, heart disease, and arthritis. They are an excellent source of iron , vitamin A, and lutein for eye health.

 

GREEN TEA

Originally from China, Green Tea is a lightly caffeinated beverage with a wide array of medicinal properties. While all tea has protective antioxidants, green tea contains the most bang for your sip. It’s full of a metabolism-boosting compound called EGCG, catechin epigallocatechin gallate, which protects against chronic diseases including heart disease, diabetes, cancer, prevents hardening of the arteries and damage to the heart muscles. Green tea may also improve bone density.


Green tea is rich in antioxidants and polyphenolic compounds which have strong anti-inflammatory effects. Research also indicates that the combination of catechins and caffeine in green tea may make it an effective tool for weight loss.

 

HEMP MILK

Hemp milk is highly nutritious and loaded with proteins and healthy fats. In fact, it has more protein and healthy fats than other popular plant-based types of milk, including rice and almond milk. Some people choose to not consume dairy to follow a vegan diet, which avoids any foods that come from an animal, including milk, cheese, eggs, and honey. Others may cut dairy out of their diet to avoid hormones and antibiotics in conventional milk.


Hemp milk is made from ground, soaked hemp seeds, which do not contain the psychoactive component of the Cannabis sativa plant. The seeds are high in protein and healthy omega-3 and omega-6 unsaturated fats. Hemp milk is virtually carb-free, but some brands add sweeteners, which increase the carb content. Make sure to check the ingredient label and buy hemp — and any other plant milk — without added sugar.

 

HORSERADISH SAUCE

Horseradish is more than just an aromatic root vegetable; It has been used medicinally all over the world for centuries. Horseradish root is naturally rich in antioxidants, which can help protect your body from cellular damage by attaching themselves to free radicals. Early studies also suggest that horseradish may prevent the growth of colon, lung, and stomach cancer cells.


Horseradish, like other members of the mustard plant family, contains a chemical compound called sinigrin. Sinigrin has been shown to help reduce inflammation by blocking or changing the parts of the immune system that cause inflammation. These same studies suggest that sinigrin could help relieve symptoms of atherosclerosis. If you’ve eaten horseradish, you’re familiar with the unique burning sensation it can set off in your nose, throat, and sinuses- which actually helps your respiratory health. Studies have shown that a supplement containing dried horseradish and nasturtium effectively treated sinus infections and bronchitis.

 

KALE

Kale is full of fiber and nutrients which may be instrumental in preventing certain chronic diseases. This powerfully nutritious plant is an excellent source of vitamins C and K. Part of what makes them so super is their potential to reduce your risk of chronic illnesses including heart disease and type 2 diabetes. They also contain high levels of anti-inflammatory compounds known as carotenoids, which may protect against certain types of cancer. They are an excellent source of iron, vitamin A, and lutein for eye health. They also add fiber into the diet.

People can cook or steam kale. They can also blend it into smoothies or juices for a nutritional kick. Throw them into salads or sauté them in a little olive oil. You can also add them to soups and stews.

 

KEFIR

Kefir is similar to yogurt, but has a thinner consistency and has typically more probiotic strains than yogurt. Fermented foods like kefir have several associated health benefits, including reduced cholesterol, lowered blood pressure, improved digestion and anti-inflammatory effects. Keifir contains protein, calcium, B vitamins, and potassium. Though kefir is traditionally made from cow’s milk, it’s typically well tolerated by people with lactose intolerance due to the fermentation of the lactose by bacteria. However, it’s also made from non-dairy beverages such as coconut milk, rice milk and coconut water.

 

LENTILS

Lentils are loaded with nutrients and play a role in preventing and managing various diseases. They are a rich source of B vitamins, various minerals, protein and fiber. Studies indicate that they offer many health benefits including improved type 2 diabetes management, as well as reduced blood pressure and cholesterol. Eating lentils regularly may also promote healthy weight maintenance, due to their ability to improve feelings of feeling full.

 

MUSHROOMS

Mushrooms, though classified as vegetables in the food world, are not technically plants. Some of the most common varieties of edible mushrooms are button, portobello, shiitake, crimini and oyster mushrooms. They belong to the fungi kingdom and provide several important nutrients. The potential health benefits of mushrooms include helping to inhibit the growth of cancer cells, regulating blood pressure, and improving immune responses to infection. Mushrooms contain polysaccharides, terpenoids, sterols, and lipids, which have been linked to lowering cholesterol-lowering and various anti-cancer effects.


Though nutrient content varies depending on the type, mushrooms contain vitamin A, potassium, fiber, and several antioxidants not present in most other foods. Interestingly, eating more mushrooms is associated with greater consumption of vegetables in general, contributing to an overall more nutritious diet. Due to their unique antioxidant content, mushrooms may also play a role in reducing inflammation.

 

OATS (STEEL CUT)

People can make oatmeal from rolled or ground oats. Coarse or steel-cut oats contain more fiber than instant varieties. Because steel-cut oats are less processed and full of more fiber than traditional oats, they're digested more slowly, keeping you full all morning long.


Oats contain high levels of a type of fiber known as beta-glucan. Beta-glucan is known to help lower levels of bad cholesterol. Oats contain complex carbohydrates, as well as water-soluble fiber. These slow down digestion and help stabilize levels of blood glucose. Oatmeal is also a good source of folate and potassium.


The potential health benefits of oats include reducing the risk of coronary artery disease, lowering the risk of cancer and lowering blood pressure.

Research has found that the cereal’s soluble fiber content helps lower cholesterol levels and reduce cardiovascular risk factors. Oats are high in magnesium, B vitamins, fiber, and manganese. Because they taste buttery and earthy, they may actually help you to not overeat

 

OLIVES (and OLIVE OIL)

Olives and Olive Oil one of the mainstays of the Mediterranean diet. Their biggest claims to health are its high levels of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and polyphenolic compounds. Olive oil is a good source of vitamin E, polyphenols, and monounsaturated fatty acids, all which help reduce the risk of heart disease. Adding Olive Oil to your diet may reduce inflammation and your risk of certain illnesses such as heart disease and diabetes. They also contain antioxidants such as vitamins E and K, which can protect against cellular damage from oxidative stress.Use Olive Oil in place of butter or margarine in pasta or rice dishes. Drizzle over vegetables, use as a dressing, or when sautéing.

 

ORANGES

Because of their high vitamin C content (over twice the daily need), oranges are associated with boosting the immune system. An orange has over 170 different phytochemicals and more than 60 flavonoids, many of which have been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties and strong antioxidant effects. Oranges also contain thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B-6, folate, pantothenic acid, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, selenium, and copper.

 

OYSTERS

Whether bought fresh, frozen, or canned, oysters keep your immune system strong. A 3-oz serving (about 6 oysters) dishes up a quarter of your daily iron, a mineral that helps your blood transport oxygen to organs and tissue. Oysters are a good source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which help prevent heart disease. Oysters can be steamed, baked, broiled, boiled, or eaten raw.

 

PECANS

Pecans are a good source of plant protein. They also contain monounsaturated fats, which may be a factor in reducing the risk of heart disease. They are rich in fiber, protein and heart-healthy fats. They also pack various plant compounds with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, which can protect against oxidative stress. Add them to oatmeal or yogurt or have as a snack. But remember they are high in calories, so limit to a small handful. Nuts are also a great accompaniment to cooked veggies or salads.

 

PUMPKIN

Pumpkin is an extremely nutrient dense food, meaning it is chock-full of vitamins and minerals but low in calories. There are many creative ways pumpkin can be incorporated into your diet, including desserts, soups, salads, preserves, and even as a substitute for butter. Pumpkin is filled with the natural cancer fighters alpha- and beta-carotene. The potential health benefits of pumpkin including supporting heart health, eye health, promoting fertility, and giving immunity a boost.

 

QUINOA

Nutritionally, quinoa is considered a whole grain. Whole grains include the entire intact grain seed without removing any of its parts. When grains are milled or refined like white breads, white rice, and white pasta, they have been processed to create a finer, lighter texture, and are not as nutrient dense. Consuming 2-3 servings of whole grain foods per day can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, colon cancer, and obesity. Many studies have shown that as whole grain intake increases, the risk for all five of these lifestyle-related conditions decreases.


Quinoa is also a great source of protein. They are high in magnesium, B vitamins, fiber, and manganese. Because they taste nutty, buttery, and earthy, that may actually help you to not overeat

 

SALMON

Virtually all fish and seafood have an impressive number of nutrients, but salmon is king. Salmon has more DHA plus EPA omega-3 fatty acids than almost any other seafood, as well as some of the lowest mercury levels. Nutritionally, wild-caught Alaskan canned salmon is as good as fresh, and it costs a fraction as much. Farmed salmon is considered just as healthy as wild caught, but not every farm adheres to the same standards.


Salmon is packed with healthy fats, protein, B vitamins, potassium and selenium. You'll get all the heart-healthy Omega-3s you need in a day by eating a 3-ounce piece of salmon for dinner. Omega-3 fatty acids are known for a variety of health benefits, such as reducing inflammation. Salmon is a great source of protein, it's high in B Vitamins, and loaded with potassium and selenium.


Including salmon in your diet may also lower your risk of heart disease and diabetes and help you maintain a healthy weight. Salmon may also help to prevent cardiovascular disease, reduce the risk of rheumatoid arthritis, boosting infant sensory, cognitive, and motor development, improving memory, protecting vision, and preventing oral and skin cancers.

 

SARDINES

Wild-caught sardines are low in mercury (unlike some types of tuna) and high in vitamin D; a three-ounce serving has as much calcium as a cup of milk. They are a highly nutritious fish packed with healthy fats, protein, B vitamins, potassium and selenium. Buy fresh, frozen, or canned.


Sardines are one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which are known for a variety of health benefits, such as reducing inflammation. Sardines can be a good source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which help prevent heart disease.


Potential health benefits of eating sardines include preventing cardiovascular disease, reducing the risk of rheumatoid arthritis, boosting infant sensory, cognitive, and motor development, improving memory, protecting vision, and preventing oral and skin cancers.

 

SCALLOPS

A 3-oz. serving of steamed scallops has 17 grams of protein for just 90 calories. That much protein will keep you full till your next meal.They are a highly nutritious fish packed with healthy fats, protein, B vitamins, potassium and selenium. Scallops are a great source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are known for a variety of health benefits, such as reducing inflammation. Adding scallops in your diet may also lower your risk of heart disease and diabetes and help you maintain a healthy weight.

 

SEAWEED

Seaweed is a term used to describe certain nutrient-rich sea vegetables. It’s most commonly consumed in Asian cuisine but is gaining popularity in other parts of the world due to its nutritional value. Seaweeds contain nutrients commonly found in green, leafy vegetables, along with most minerals found in the ocean.


Seaweed packs multiple nutrients, including vitamin K, folate, iodine and fiber. These ocean vegetables are a source of unique bioactive compounds — not typically present in land-vegetables — which may have antioxidant effects. Seaweed may also reduce your risk of cancer, heart disease, obesity and diabetes: Seaweed is where fish procure their Omega-3’s, meaning you can skip the fish and go straight to the seaweed, as they can be a good source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids, which help prevent heart disease. Buy fresh, frozen, or canned. They’re also full of magnesium, which may prevent migraines and asthma attacks. Grate nori on seafood or salads, or use it to make healthy wraps.

 

SPINACH

Spinach is an example of a leafy green with antioxidant content, especially when it is raw, steamed, or very lightly boiled. A half-cup of spinach provides more than five times your daily dose of vitamin K, which helps blood clot and builds strong bones. They are an excellent source of iron (especially important for women), vitamin A, and lutein for eye health. They also add fiber into the diet. consuming leafy greens for 6 weeks led to a significant reduction in cardiovascular risk factors. Throw them into salads or sauté them in a little Olive Oil. You can also add them to soups and stews.

 

STRAWBERRIES

Strawberries are one of the most popular, refreshing, and healthy treats on the planet; they contain many vitamins and antioxidants that can be beneficial for your health. The potential health benefits of strawberries include reducing the risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, blood pressure, constipation, allergies, diabetes, and depression. Strawberries are loaded with ellagitannins, phytochemicals that may halt the growth of cervical and colon cancers

 

SUNFLOWER SEEDS

Sunflower seeds are a good source of plant protein. They also contain monounsaturated fats, which may be a factor in reducing the risk of heart disease. They are also a great accompaniment to cooked veggies or salads. A quarter-cup of sunflower seeds delivers 14 grams of healthy mono- and polyunsaturated fats, which keeps your heart healthy and reduces your risk of cardiovascular disease.


Sunflower Seeds are rich in fiber, protein and heart-healthy fats. They also pack various plant compounds with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, which can protect against oxidative stress. Add a handful to oatmeal or yogurt or have as a snack. You can also grind these and make a low-carb flour. But remember they are high in calories, so limit to a small handful.

 

SWEET POTATOES

Sweet potatoes are a nutritious, filling, and delicious staple food that has its place in everyone’s diet. The sweet potato is a root vegetable loaded with many nutrients, including potassium and fiber. They have over 400 percent of your daily needs for vitamin A in one medium potato, plus high levels of fiber and potassium.They’re also a good source of carotenoids, a type of antioxidant that may reduce your risk of certain types of cancer. Whether orange or white, sweet potatoes contain phytonutrients that promote heart and eye health and boost immunity. They’re chock full of beta-carotene (thought to lower breast cancer risk) and vitamin A (which may reduce the effects of smoking).


Sweet potatoes deliver a healthy dose of vitamin A, which protects your vision and immune system. Sweet potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin C, manganese, copper, vitamin B6. They’re also a good source of potassium, dietary fiber, niacin, vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and phosphorus.


The potential health benefits of sweet potatoes include a protective role against prostate cancer, promoting fertility, boosting immunity, and supporting vision.

Despite their sweet flavor, sweet potatoes don’t increase blood sugar as much as you might expect. Interestingly, they may actually improve blood sugar control in those with type 2 diabetes. Sweet potatoes provide dietary fiber, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B-6, and potassium.

 

SWISS CHARD

Like all leafy greens, Swiss chard is low in calories and chock-full of important vitamins and minerals. They are an excellent source of iron, vitamin A, and lutein for eye health. They are an excellent source of fiber, vitamins, and phytochemicals including indoles, thiocyanates, and nitriles, which may prevent against some types of cancer.


Add them to salads, steam or stir-fry, adding healthy oils and herbs and seasonings for flavor. Try adding them to soups, casseroles, and pasta dishes. Sauté them in a little olive oil. It also adds more color to your plate.

 

TOMATOES

The tomato is a superfood that goes beyond providing just basic nutrition. Tomatoes are a rich source of vitamins A and C and folic acid and contain a wide array of beneficial nutrients and antioxidants, including alpha-lipoic acid, choline, folic acid, beta-carotene, and lutein.The benefits of consuming tomatoes are infinite.


Having tomatoes as a regular part of your diet, reduces the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer; additionally preventing chronic disease and other health benefits due to beneficial phytochemicals such as lycopene- a plant nutrient that gives tomatoes their red color. Lycopene helps reduce inflammation and cell damage from sun exposure. The nutrients has also been linked to many benefits, like keeping your heart healthy and protecting against strokes and reduce the risk of prostate cancer.


Try tomatoes in a salad or as a tomato sauce over your pasta. You can also put them in stews, soups, or chili. Lycopene becomes more available for your body to use when tomatoes are prepared and heated in a healthy fat such as Olive Oil.

 

TUNA

Tuna is a highly nutritious fish packed with protein, healthy fats, B vitamins, potassium and selenium. It’s one of the best sources of omega-3 fatty acids, which are known for a variety of health benefits, such as reducing inflammation and preventing heart disease.


Adding tuna in your diet- whether fresh, frozen, or canned, may also lower your risk of heart disease and diabetes and help you maintain a healthy weight.

Other potential health benefits of eating tuna include preventing cardiovascular disease, reducing the risk of rheumatoid arthritis, boosting infant sensory, cognitive, and motor development, improving memory, protecting vision, and preventing oral and skin cancers.