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  • Rock Rousseau

Italian Veal Osso Buco

Updated: Nov 26, 2019


Osso buco is an Italian specialty of cross-cut veal shanks braised with vegetables, wine, and broth. It is garnished with gremolata and traditionally served on a bed of buttered risotto or polenta. The infusion of herbs and wine, while slow cooking the veal makes this an incredibly flavorful meal.

  • 3 pounds veal osso buco, center cuts (6 pieces)

  • ¼ cup preferred all-purpose flour

  • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil

  • 1 large white onion, chopped

  • 3 celery stalks, chopped

  • 3 large carrots, chopped

  • 6 oz can tomato paste

  • 1 vine ripened tomato, chopped

  • 1 cup red wine

  • 3 cups vegetable stock

  • 1 sprig fresh rosemary

  • 1 sprig fresh thyme

  • 1 bay leaf

  • 1 bunch basil

  • 3 TBSN fresh flat-leaf Italian parsley, chopped

  • 1 TBSN lemon zest

  • 1 pound polenta

  • 1 cup grated fontina

  • 2 TBSN butter

  • Pinch of sugar

  • Salt and pepper

  • Cheesecloth and kitchen twine, for bouquet garni and tying the veal shanks



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Kitchen twine, cheesecloth, large Dutch oven pot, large pot, medium Large mixing bowl, cooking spoon, measuring cup, measuring spoons, colander

Prep: 30 min Cook: 3 hours Ready: 3 hours, 30 min Serves: 3


Before dredging the veal, cut 3-4 slots on each piece This will help keep the vehicle white and avoid creating an oddly shaped nest.

1. Pat dry the veal shanks with paper towels to remove any excess moisture. Veal shanks will brown better when they are dry. Let sit at room temperature for 30 minutes then dredge the veal in flour and shake off excess.


2. Season each shank with salt and freshly ground pepper. Place the rosemary, thyme, and bay leaf into cheesecloth and secure with twine. This will be your bouquet garni. Set aside.


3. In a large Dutch oven pot, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Cook the veal in batches, until browned all over, 3 minutes each side. Remove from the pot and set aside to rest.


4. In the same pot, add the extra virgin olive oil without cleaning the pot. Cook the onion at medium heat until translucent, 5 minutes, scraping up the remaining pieces of meat. Add the celery and carrot and stir until vegetables soften. Season with salt at this point to help draw out the moisture from the vegetables. Increase to medium-high heat and add the tomato paste.


5. Add the wine, bouquet garni, and 2 cups of the vegetable stock. Bring to a boil then simmer. Preheat oven at 250 degrees F.

6. in a greased lasagne pan, add the chopped tomatoes and veal shanks.

Top with sauce, bouquet, and vegetables to pan, covering the veal and have sauce come up to 2/3 high on the veal. Bake for 2-3 hours, until the veal is soft enough to cut with a fork. Check every 30 minutes, turning shanks and adding more stock if necessary. The level of cooking liquid should always be about 2/3 the way up the shanks.


6. While the veal simmers, chop the basil, parsley and lemon zest for topping the osso buco. Set aside.


7. 30 minutes before veal is ready, make the polenta: bring 5 cups of water, to a boil and cook the polenta until al dente. Drain and add back to pot on low heat. Add the fontina, butter, and sugar. Stir to combine.


8. Serve a bed of polenta on each plate. Carefully add osso buco over polenta, adding some of the juice from the pot. Remove twine.


9. Top with gremolata; chopped parsley, basil, and lemon zest and serve immediately.



1 serving: Calories 182

Total Fat 7.8g

Cholesterol 92mg

Sodium 90mg

Carbohydrate 0.1g

Dietary Fiber 0g

Sugar 0.5g

Protein 28g

Veal delivers more than 10% of the daily values for protein, zinc, niacin, as well as vitamin B12 and B6. Protein and B-vitamins help us increase our energy levels. Zinc maintains immune function and plays a key role in growth and cognitive development.

Brunello, a Tuscan full-bodied wine, pairs great with Osso Buco. California wines, such as bigger and bolder Zinfandel and Pinot Noir.



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